Ad Innovation News: Tinder Swipes Right on Programmatic

Each weekday, we bring you the most relevant stories about ad tech, video innovation and publisher tools to keep you informed about industry happenings.

Tinder swipes right on programmatic advertising, enlisting the help of Facebook’s audience network. Dow Jones increases native video to keep up with a demand for pre-roll video ads.

Dow Jones Increases Native Video

By Kelly Liyakasa @ AdExchanger

Like many publishers, Dow Jones has a huge demand for video (especially for pre-rolls) but not enough content. Pre-roll tends to have higher CPMs, but the inventory tends to sell-out more quickly. Dow Jones is increasing its investment in native video in addition to using the video player/ad server Connatix as a native demand source for the non-pre-roll formats it monetizes using Sharethrough, Unruly and Teads.

Tinder Swipes Right on Programmatic Advertising

By Ilyse Liffreing @ Campaign US

Tinder has partnered with Facebook’s Audience Network so advertisers can now buy Tinder ads programmatically, offering advertisers a new way to buy and place ads. eMarketer projects that this year, programmatic will represent 73% of all display ad spending. By 2018, 75% of all programmatic display ads will be on mobile.

How Independent Publishers Can Fight the Google-Facebook Duopoly

By Alex Merwin @ Advertising Age

Google and Facebook control 85% of media spend and 80% of referral traffic to independent publishers. Independent publishers can utilize real-time bidding and header bidding to get standardized and democratized access to audiences at scale, but unfortunately audience data is highly fragmented.

Inside the Clinton Campaign’s TV Data Strategy

By Kate Kaye @ Advertising Age

The Clinton campaign may have relied too heavily on set-top box TV advertising targeting. Developer/analyst Carol Davidsen laments the campaign’s decision not to use a new ComScore TV analytics platform she helped build for 2016.

Envisioning The Future In A Server-Side Header Bidding World

By Rachel Parkin @ AdExchanger

The speed of server-side header bidding auctions will shift attention to the impact of ads on page load times and make advertisers equal partners in creating a better user experience.

Snap Partners with IPG on Startup Investment Program

By Alexandra Bruell @ Wall Street Journal

Snap Inc. is partnering with IPG’s digital marketing agency R/GA– they will select up to 10 marketing tech startups that make it easier for brands to create mobile content, such as companies exploring artificial intelligence and data and analytics. R/GA and Snap will provide the funds, time and expertise in an exchange for equity stakes. This also helps Snap cozy up to several of the media-buying arms of big ad agencies.

Buyers see Potential in Facebook’s TV push

By Ross Benes @ Digiday

Facebook has expanded its video offerings in an effort to tap into TV ad dollars. The platform tweaked its algorithm to put more emphasis on longer videos, began testing ads that will run in the middle of videos that are least 90 seconds long, gave marketers tools to compare TV and digital ads, and is reported to be developing a video app for set-top boxes.

Facebook’s Video Future is Actually Short Form, Not Long Form

By Nathan McAlone @ Business Insider

Earlier this week, Facebook seemed poised to take on traditional TV and Netflix by reportedly planning to license “long-form, TV-quality programming,” to be housed in its own set-top box app, and on your phone– but now Zuckerberg is describing a vision that looks more like YouTube, with shorter-form content. Facebook’s CFO David Wehner distanced Facebook from Netflix, saying “Our focus is on kickstarting the ecosystem here,” Wehner said. To the extent that Facebook would license any shows, it would only be to seed the ecosystem. Facebook wouldn’t be “doing big deals,” he said. One reason is because Facebook, like YouTube, is committed to a revenue-share model, according to Wehner.

Kickstarter Acquires Live Streaming Company Huzza

By Tom Regan @ Engadget

Kickstarter just announced that it has purchased Huzza, the live-streaming startup that helped create Kickstarter Live. Like Twitch for creators, Live is a video platform that helps facilitate Q+As and connects causes with donors. According to Kickstarter, 74% of creators who stream on the platform get funded, with the average viewer spending over 16 minutes watching live streams.